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Inspectors Uncover Dozens of Violations at Chinese Factory Used by Ivanka Trump

Investigators recently uncovered dozens of violations at a factory used by Ivanka Trump’s clothing-brand in China.

Since 2012, Ivanka Trump’s clothing has been made by exclusively by G-III Apparel Group. Other brands working with the manufacturing middle-man include Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger.

Trump has championed the company, saying in a 2012 statement that “G-III has distinguished itself as a trusted partner for some of the world’s finest and most visible brands.”

A recent audit shows that one factory used by G-III made its workers work 60 hours a week to earn wages of little more than $62 a week, among many other infringements.

The Washington Post reports:

Inspectors with the Fair Labor Association, an industry monitoring group whose members include Apple and Nike, found two dozen violations of international labor standards during a two-day tour of the factory in October, saying in a report that workers faced daunting hours, high turnover, and pay near or below China’s minimum wage.

The inspection offers a rare look at the working conditions of the global manufacturing machine that helped make Trump’s fashion brand a multimillion-dollar business.

Other violations at the factory include:

  • Workers were required to work 57 hours a week “on a regular basis” to hit production targets. Though Chinese law sets the limit for overtime at 36 hours per month, workers exceeded that limit, working up to 82 hours of overtime a month between September 2015 and August 2016.
  • The factory’s workers made between 1,879 and 2,088 yuan a month, or roughly $255 to $283, below the minimum wage in some parts of China. The average manufacturing employee in urban China made twice as much money as the factory’s workers, or roughly 4,280 yuan a month,
  • Fewer than a third of the factory’s workers were offered legally mandated coverage under China’s “social insurance” benefits, including a pension and medical, maternity, unemployment and work-related injury insurance,
  • The factory also did not contribute, as legally required, to a fund designed to help workers afford housing,
  • It did not train loading workers on safety techniques or provide employees with equipment that could reduce injury, including lifting belts or seats with backrests.
  • The factory ever sought an assessment of occupational disease hazards like those common among workers dealing with repetitive tasks and harsh chemicals.

Trump does not have a leadership role in G-III and it is not clear if her products were being made at the time of the investigation.

Ivanka Trump’s company declined to comment on the factory inspection. Messages left with G-III were not returned.