Gay Syrian Refugee

‘I Am a Human Being’: Read This Gay Syrian Refugee’s Letter to Donald Trump

Gay Syrian refugee Subhi Nahas penned an honest letter to Donald Trump in honor of President’s Day and you have to read it.

Nahas came to the United States as a refugee in 2015. Since then, he spoke before the U.N. Security Council (the first openly gay civilian ever to do so), was a grand Marshall at LGBT Pride in New York City and started an organization to help others just like him.

Here are some highlights from his essay:

On Trump’s executive order banning refugees:

When I learned about President Trump’s executive order indefinitely banning Syrian refugees from the United States, I was devastated. As a gay Syrian refugee who was able to build a new life in the United States, I had flashbacks to the terrifying months and years leading up to my arrival here.

As a new American and proud Californian, I was glad to see the Ninth Circuit ruling that refused to reinstate the executive order. But the future of the United States’ refugee program is still uncertain. I fear that others like me will be forced to face danger and possible death.

On growing up gay in Syria:

Growing up north of Damascus in the city of Idlib, I faced relentless bullying in school for being effeminate. When I was a teenager my parents discovered that I was gay and for many years I became a prisoner in my home, subjected to abuse and homophobia by my own family.

This chilling account:

One day in 2012 Syrian soldiers stopped the bus I was riding and they took me and other passengers to a secluded house. There they mocked me and mercilessly spewed anti-LGBT slurs. I was certain I would be killed. Miraculously, I was released.

His plea to Trump:

While we don’t know yet what the Trump Administration will do next, it seems clear that it still falsely believes that banning refugees will protect the United States from terrorists. But refugees aren’t terrorists, President Trump. We’re human beings fleeing from terror and longing to live our lives in freedom and safety.

To find out more about Nahas’ organization Spectra Project, visit here.