gay teens, unicorn booty
gay teens, unicorn booty

I Tried To Kill Myself After Gay Porn Outed Me

gay teens, unicorn booty
Kevin Farrell, Unicorn Booty Editor

If Corbin Fishergate doesn’t ring a bell to you, you haven’t been paying attention to your gay porn studio news this month, obviously. These things happen though. Here’s what went down in a nutshell:

All caught up? Fantastic. On Friday, Corbin Fisher’s COO, Brian Dunlap gave an interview to a super NSFW gay porn blog called The Sword; after making fun of our name (Pshh!), they accused us and the bloggers at Queerty of fabricating the glaringly obvious threat to closeted gay teens that outing people via lawsuit posed.

Dunlap told The Sword:

But I challenge that very assumption, based upon a mountain of evidence that is way beyond anything these bloggers have offered. I’d challenge you to read through the posts by UnicornBooty, Queerty et al and find a single instance in which the authors of those pieces introduced anything more than their own assumptions. …We’ve compiled ample evidence to suggest it will not (and I acknowledge that there are no absolute certainties in any situation, really, but I’d say those proposing that idea have as much of an obligation to back up their assumptions as we do.

The writings on the wall are clear to us: Many illegal downloaders are gay teens without credit cards. Blackmailing people into paying you $1900 for crimes they haven’t even been charged with is a crime worse than downloading pirated pornos. With so many real world examples of gay teens harming themselves over the past year it is hardly inconceivable to imagine someone committing suicide or being disowned by their family after being outed via a lawsuit from a bullying gay porn company – these obvious concerns that thousands of us share are for whatever reason unbelievable to Corbin Fisher.

The company insists that we are making these concerns up and they have challenged us to point to a particular example of a gay teen harming himself after being outed by gay porn.

So here I am.

Yup. My name is Kevin Farrell, and when I was twelve years old my parents discovered gay porn on our family computer. They kicked me out that week, and have spoken to me three times since I was twelve. TWELVE. When I was sixteen (and still completely ignorant about deleting my browser history), the same thing happened again while I was living with an Aunt. When she kicked me out, I found myself homeless and living in a park in South Philadelphia for months. It was about this time in my life that I tried to commit suicide.

I’m 27 years old now, and have dedicated myself to helping the gay community, and LGBT teens in particular. My company, Unicorn Booty, connects people with gay-friendly businesses and news. I strive to donate 10% of my income to LGBT nonprofit organizations. I volunteer. I was a Big Brother in college, and I’ve cooked for and managed homeless shelters. I’m hardly a saint, but I am a person who tries to do right by my family, friends, and the LGBT community that has done so much for me.

Since Corbin Fisher insists on seeing proof that their actions can harm at-risk people in the LGBT community before taking the concerns of thousands of people seriously, I have no problem offering them my own story. My parents disowned their twelve year old boy when they saw he had been looking at gay porn online. Had this discovery been paired with a lawsuit against them for my actions, I know the consequences would have been horrendously worse.

I know that gay teens cannot be protected from the myriad ways that can out them: friends, Facebook, browser histories, etc. etc.  I know that gay companies have the right to protect their IP like their straight counterparts. I know that teenagers, just like anyone else, are responsible for their actions – including illegally downloading gay porn. We get that the issue is complex one, but coming out is also an essential and emotional part of the gay identity. It must be dealt with compassionately and thoughtfully – which has not happened in Corbin Fisher’s ham-fisted quest.

To Mr. Dunlap, Mr. Randazza, and the entire team at Corbin Fisher, I’m not making assumptions about the dangerous road your company has set out on. I am living proof that you’re making a horrible mistake. It’s not too late to abandon the course you’re on and address the problem rather than the symptoms. If you don’t want people stealing your content, up your security measures. What about a watermark that has the user’s ID in the corner under your logo, so that people know they will be identified if they share? UB readers have pointed out that very specific technologies exist that will put an end to the problem you are having. A campaign of lawsuits coupled with callous comments and sloppily handled PR is hardly the answer.

Check yourselves. You’re acting like jerks.