Louis C.K. faggot
Louis C.K. faggot

Let’s Not Forget That Serial Sex Abuser Louis C.K. Is Also Really Fond of a Certain Gay Slur

Comedian Louis C.K. has admitted to sexual misconduct with at least five women following a New York Times exposé published yesterday. The women accused the Mexican-American actor of either masturbating in their presence or asking if he could.

C.K. became most famous from his self-deprecating semi-autobiographical comedy series Louie, which aired for five seasons between 2009 and 2015. But in 2011, C.K. became infamous throughout gay media for his stand-up routine in which he explained and defended his use of the word “faggot.”

 

The Louis C.K. Faggot Routine

In a 2011 stand-up routine, C.K. defended his use of the word “faggot,” stating that he used it not to refer to gay people but to people who behave in a prissy, annoying, pseudo-intellectual manner.

He joked that if he saw two men having oral sex, and the receptive partner stopped to say “You know, people from Phoenix are Phoenicians,” that he would say “Quit being a faggot and suck that dick.”‘

He also said that he has a great deal of respect for anyone who sucks a dick because it’s something that he figures doesn’t come easily to anyone and requires a bit of effort.

Gay stand-up comedian Chris Doucette wrote, “Despite his justifications, there’s no getting around it. The word ‘faggot’ is an insult because of its history as a slur against gay guys. He continues:

Gay men are used as the comedy industry’s premise, and yet gay male comedians aren’t included as regular, equal, on-camera members of the team on any of the most successful mainstream comedy shows. Using gay guys as the premise of the joke year after year without ever including an actual gay guy is simply gay exploitation.

C.K. also addressed his use of the word in an early 2010 episode of Louie, albeit with more nuance and a gay character commenting on the word’s effect on gay people.

In the episode, a gay friend of the comedian says:

Well, the word “faggot” really means a bundle of sticks used for kindling in a fire. Now, in the middle ages, when they used to burn people they thought were witches? They used to burn homosexuals, too. And, they used to burn the witches at a stake, but they thought the homosexuals were too low and disgusting to be given a stake to be burnt on, so they used to just throw them in with the kindling, with the other faggots. So that’s how you get “flaming faggot….”

You might wanna know that every gay man in America has probably had that word shouted at them while they’re being beaten up, sometimes many times, sometimes by a lot of people all at once. So, when you say it, it kind of brings that all back up. But, you know, by all means, use it. Get your laughs. But, you know, now you know what it means.

The scene ends with another man telling the gay man, “Okay, thanks faggot. We’ll keep that in mind.” While the etymology of “faggot” from the scene is interesting — it’s also false.

RELATED | Are Gay Men Allowed to Say the Word ‘F*ggot?’ (Video)

C.K. has reportedly stopped saying the word in his stand-up routines despite allegedly not having any “internal censors.”

 

Louis C.K. has admitted to the sexual abuse allegations

The five women in the New York Times story all say that they had admired C.K. and felt unsure of how to mention his sexual misconduct without potentially wrecking their own careers. They allege that C.K.’s manager communicated upset with them for talking openly about their incidents, but the manager claims that he never threatened the women in any way for sharing their experiences.

Louis C.K. is also an executive producer of One Mississippi, an Amazon series by lesbian comedian Tig Notaro. Notaro has strongly suggested that an episode of her show involving a progressive radio station programmer who masturbates in front of a female colleague was about him. The episode showed that “the facts of the assault are simple, but the system for handling it is not.”

C.K.’s comedy series Louie often made transgressive humor by exploring his and other people’s struggles with sexual needs, depravity and aggression. Several critics have assumed that he used his self-deprecating humor served as a form of self-criticism that disempowered his would-be detractors and allowed him to salvage some power and ego.

In his public statement, Louis C.K. wrote:

I want to address the stories told to the New York Times by five women named Abby, Rebecca, Dana, Julia who felt able to name themselves and one who did not.

These stories are true. At the time, I said to myself that what I did was okay because I never showed a woman my dick without asking first, which is also true. But what I learned later in life, too late, is that when you have power over another person, asking them to look at your dick isn’t a question. It’s a predicament for them. The power I had over these women is that they admired me. And I wielded that power irresponsibly.

I have been remorseful of my actions. And I’ve tried to learn from them. And run from them. Now I’m aware of the extent of the impact of my actions. I learned yesterday the extent to which I left these women who admired me feeling badly about themselves and cautious around other men who would never have put them in that position.

I also took advantage of the fact that I was widely admired in my and their community, which disabled them from sharing their story and brought hardship to them when they tried because people who look up to me didn’t want to hear it. I didn’t think that I was doing any of that because my position allowed me not to think about it.

There is nothing about this that I forgive myself for. And I have to reconcile it with who I am. Which is nothing compared to the task I left them with.

I wish I had reacted to their admiration of me by being a good example to them as a man and given them some guidance as a comedian, including because I admired their work.

He then apologizes for the hurt he has caused them, his professional colleagues, his manager, family, friends, children and their mother. He concludes by writing, “I have spent my long and lucky career talking and saying anything I want. I will now step back and take a long time to listen.”