Pat McCrory, North Carolina, governor, lol, HB2, laugh, mock

NC Governor’s Friends Are Shunning Him Over His Anti-Trans Law

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory is feeling the sting of supporting his state’s law requiring trans people to use the bathroom matching the gender on their birth certificates. Not only has his state lost an estimated $395 million in revenue due to boycotts after he signed the needlessly transphobic law, he’s apparently also getting death threats and being shunned by friends and politicians as a result.

To be clear, we’re very anti-death threat, even if someone passes a law that endangers the lives of trans people by painting them as child molesters and sexual predators. McCrory is a scummy piece of cis-het trash, but death threats are illegal, cruel and unacceptable, no matter the target, period.

That being said, it’s funny to hear McCrory crying about how he and his wife have been treated like garbage. According to The Charlotte Observer, McCrory told a conservative conference that his friends and associates have said:

“Although you’ve been an outstanding governor, we still cannot support you because [the Human Rights Campaign] will attack us… And I’ve had at least five this week tell me that. Good friends. Very good friends. ‘Pat, I love ya. I love ya man, we’ll be friends for life. We just can’t support you.”

He continued:

“My wife, for example, in Charlotte – she primarily stays in Charlotte… She’s been disinvited to charity events. Basically, they call her up and say, ‘You better not come. You better not come…”

McCrory also made some boneheaded comparison about pro-LGBT people being like Big Brother or the Thought Police from George Orwell’s 1984 — “If you disagree… you will be purged, and you will disappear,” he said — but anyone who has actually read that book knows that both of those entities were tools of government oppression… tools, just like McCrory.

The dillweed is also up for re-election this year and polls have showed his competitor, Roy Cooper, in the lead for most of the race. Cooper has publicly spoken against the law, but getting rid of it will take require the North Carolina legislature to pass a repeal. Makes you wonder whether the legislators’ friends and political associates have started shunning them as well.