HIV, AIDS, Amsterdam, Sculpture
HIV, AIDS, Amsterdam, Sculpture

Around the World: New HIV Sculpture in Amsterdam, UK Launches PrEP Trial, HIV on the Rise in Philippines

In Amsterdam—similar to New York—they just unveiled a new sculpture for AIDS Awareness. The sculpture is a giant abacus, designed to countdown the days until AIDS is eradicated. That and more in our look at HIV news from around the world!

  • UNAIDS is publishing a series of case studies that explore the specific ways the program has contributed to the global AIDS response. The first report examines UNAIDS in Nigeria and its role in establishing the Coalition of Lawyers for Human Rights, the first and only organization to provide legal advice and representation to people living with, affected by or at risk of HIV in Nigeria, including LGBTI people.

    “UNAIDS works tirelessly to ensure that stigma, politics and law do not keep people from the HIV services they need. The rights of all people to access services, to know their rights and to have the power to redress violations of their rights is essential—essential to upholding human dignity and essential to ending AIDS.”  —Luiz Loures, Deputy Executive Director, UNAIDS

  • The 1st of December brought the 28th annual World AIDS Day—this year’s theme “Hands Up For #HIVPrevention” focused on how HIV affects communities differently and the strategies to prevent new infections. Visiting Namibia, UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibé launched a new report Get on the Fast-Track: the life-cycle approach to HIV.

World AIDS Day, World HIV Day, Justin Trudeau, AIDS, HIV
Trudeau raises the World AIDS Day flag in Canada
  • First recognized in 1988, World AIDS Day is one of the 8 official global public health days of the WHO. From Chennai, India’s sand sculptures to Cologne, Germany’s giant condom to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau raising an AIDS ribbon flag above Canada’s Parliament Hill—the day was celebrated across nations. 

  • As a new major vaccine trial begins in South Africa, Amsterdam unveiled a new sculpture of a giant abacus that “counts down” the days till the world is free of AIDS.

  • UNAIDS hosted “Moving Forward Together: Leaving No One Behind” at the UN headquarters in New York at which Mr Sibidé presented Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon with the UNAIDS Award for Leadership for “acting as a voice for the voiceless”. A firm supporter of LGBTI rights, in his acceptance, Ki-moon emphasized the need to end hatred and bigotry and to protect vulnerable groups from stigma and abuse.

  • A new report from Human Rights Watch examines why HIV prevalence has increased significantly in the Philippines, especially among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men. It notes that a lack of sexual health education and government restrictions on condom access may be contributing factors.

  • In Australia, the Annual HIV Surveillance Report showed that men born in South East Asia accounted for 15% of all diagnosis among men who have sex with men, and 44% of new diagnoses among those born overseas. As experts suggest cultural conservatism and stigma has contributed to these rates, support groups are looking to tailor culturally specific initiatives to improve HIV prevention and care.

  • After losing an appeal last month to stop funding PrEP, NHS England announced it is launching a clinical trial of PrEP that will provide the medicine to 10,000 participants over the next three years. 

     


Equal Eyes, UNAIDS, logo, news, rainbow, LGBT, LGBTQIAA, LGBTQ, queer, gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgenderHornet brings attention to global issues of significance for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people. Our partnership with Equal Eyes, a news source produced in collaboration with UNAIDS, the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS, is part of that effort. To learn more, visit their site at Equal-Eyes.org

This coverage promotes sexual and gender equality while highlighting issues of health, violence, culture, and legal and human rights. Equal Eyes provides advocates and allies a common frame of reference for the realities of global LGBTI communities. Through followup reporting and disseminating this coverage, our effort is to ensure we have a representation of the global stories that matter most or may have under-reporting.

(Featured image via Simon Verhoef.)