Tires Slashed on 30 Chicago Pride Floats

Tires Slashed on 30 Chicago Pride Floats

Be first to like this.
Translate this Story and earn Hornet Points!

Chuck Huser, owner of long-time Pride float provider Assocated Attractions at 4834 S. Halsted on Chicago’s South Side, said the floats were fine when he left 8 p.m. Saturday night, but when he returned 5 a.m. Sunday to start preparation for drivers to depart, he found two tires punctured each on more than 30 floats.

“This is catastrophic,” he told Windy City Times at 8 a.m. June 26. “This has never happened before, and we have been doing this since 1989.”

“They didn’t want these folks to go out,” Huser said. He added that he has no disgruntled employees or customers, and that most of his workers have been with him more than 20 years.

Huser was thankfully able to find an open tire shop Sunday morning able to replace most of the vandalized tires. And thanks to a little moving and shaking in the lineup, there were no noticeable delays in the parade.

Still, Huser has filed a police report, and the investigation is being conducted with hate crime charges in mind.

Let’s hope they catch the jerk(s) who tried to rain on Chicago’s parade.

(via Windy City Times)

Related Stories

The Unreal Story of Claude Cahun, the Lesbian Photographer Who Fought Off the Nazis
This Artist Reimagined the Zodiac Signs as 12 Hunky Lumbersexuals
13 Films That Say 'Screw Romance' and Stab Love in the Eye Then Twist
How 4 Non Blondes' 1992 Hit 'What’s Up?' Became a Modern Queer Anthem (Video)
Queer Studies Professors Share Their Favorite Horror Movies of All Time
Female Trouble: 10 Unusual Horror Movies Directed by Women
A Brief History of Annoying Valentine’s Day Traditions
Drag Spies And Gay Robots: 5 Queer Sci-Fi Films You May Have Missed
The 20 Greatest Queer Video Game Characters of All Time
Our Roundup of Films Where Bisexuals Aren't Portrayed as Villainous, Confused Creeps
Just a Friendly Reminder That Jesus Was ... Well, a Little Gay
The Final Episode of 'Dinosaurs' Is Still the Saddest, Most Poignant Finale in TV History
Quantcast