Uruguay, LGBTQ, Good News, South America
Uruguay, LGBTQ, Good News, South America

Uruguay is Urugay — and More Good News From Around The World!

Uruguay has, for the three years running has topped the list of countries in South and Central America when it comes to supporting its queer citizens! They’ve got marriage equality, adoption rights and their laws are progressive when it comes to gender identity! That and more in our look at good news from around the world!

  • The World Bank announced the selection of Clifton Cortez as the first Advisor on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity issues. The senior-level position is part of the coordinated, strategic approach to improve LGBTI inclusion and gender equality through the Bank’s work.
  • The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) is a mechanism established by the UN in 2006 to address human rights issues through “country reviews” of all UN nations. A new analysis from ARC International, ILGA, and the International Bar Association’s Human Rights Institute (IBAHRI) found that in its first two cycles the UPR has been “one of the most progressive vehicles for the protection of the rights of LGBTI persons all over the world”.
  • The Americas Society and the Council of the Americas (AS/COS) selected Uruguay as the leader of its Social Inclusion Index, an annual survey that measures how countries in the region serve their citizens. Uruguay has ranked number one for three years in part for its support of LGBT citizens, including marriage equality, adoption rights, and progressive gender identity laws. Among the rankings, Argentina and Brazil also scored highly on LGBT issues, while Panama ranked lowest.
  • Human Dignity Trust hosted a panel of experts to discuss “Breaking the Silence”, the first global analysis of criminalization and persecution of lesbian and bisexual women. An audio recording of the discussion is now available to the public. 
  • Organisation Intersex International (OII) Europe launched a new website about being intersex that includes resources and testimonials in 23 languages.
  • Canada implemented a new Electronic Travel Authorizations system that for the first time allows travelers to identify as male, female, or other. Canadian citizens will soon be able to change gender on their official documents.
  • For the first time, Taiwan’s Taipei City Hall raised a rainbow flag alongside the national and city flags to support the Taiwan LGBT Pride Parade. Reports suggest around 80,000 people marched through downtown Taipei during the parade. 
  • The city council of Perm, Russia is considering defying the country’s Anti-Gay Propaganda Ban by allowing the public to hold a Pride parade. Activists urged the council to consider existing laws that protect freedom of expression and freedom of assembly. Meanwhile, some residents started a counter-petition arguing they “have a right to live on their land without facing the public promotion of homosexuality”.
  • OUTstanding and the Financial Times celebrated the success of the LGBT community with a list of the year’s “Leading 100 LGBT Executives” from around the world. The list includes Gigi Chao—Executive Vice Chairman of  Hong Kong real estate firm Cheuk Nang Holdings, Jonathan Mildenhall—Chief Marketing Officer of Airbnb, and Peter Arvai—Hungarian CEO and co-founder of Prezi.

Equal Eyes, UNAIDS, logo, news, rainbow, LGBT, LGBTQIAA, LGBTQ, queer, gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgenderUnicorn Booty brings attentions to global issues of significance for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people. Our partnership with Equal Eyes, a news source produced in collaboration with UNAIDS, the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS, is part of that effort. To learn more, visit their site at Equal-Eyes.org

This coverage promotes sexual and gender equality while highlighting issues of health, violence, culture, and legal and human rights. Equal Eyes provides advocates and allies a common frame of reference for the realities of global LGBTI communities. Through followup reporting and disseminating this coverage, our effort is to ensure we have a representation of the global stories that matter most or may have under-reporting.

(Featured image via Jimmy Baikovicius/Flickr)